Sunday, April 19, 2015

Duvel Tripel Hop 2015 officially launched


This stronger version of a Duvel was brewed using three varieties of hops. In addition to the familiar Saaz-Saaz and Styrian Golding there is a third variety which changes every year.
The Duvel Tripel Hop remains a Duvel, albeit with a higher alcohol content, a higher density and a more powerful bitter flavour. Its pearlisation and frothy collar contribute to the familiar Duvel signature. However, the beer is explosively different when it comes to aroma and taste. “You should never be in doubt between a Duvel and a Duvel Tripel Hop,” says the brewer.

With their Duvel Tripel Hop has Duvel Moortgat joined the fashionable quest for hop bitterness pursued by all those craft brewers with their many India Pale Ales (IPA)?  Well there is a simple answer to that question - no - the Duvel Tripel Hop cannot be described as a classic IPA.
What started in 2007 as a one-off experiment and produced in only a limited volume has turned into a regular release since 2012.
In addition to the strong blonde Duvel, the brewing diary now includes the – even stronger - Duvel Tripel Hop (9.5% ABV).
Just like the flagship Duvel, this beer is brewed with Saaz-Saaz and Styrian Golding hops.

Fundamentally Different
Even while we discuss the latest edition, the brewers have started preparations for Duvel Tripel Hop 2016. Hedwig Neven: “We experiment with different varieties of hops, research their qualities, taste the various combination and, once all the noses are pointing in the same direction, our team, made up of four brewing engineers, will give its approval.”
Duvel Tripel Hop is fundamentally different from the classic Duvel. And convinced Duvel fans are not always won over by this variant – whether you love Duvel Tripel Hop will depend very much on individual taste and aroma preferences.
The classic Duvel recipe forms the basis of Duvel Tripel Hop, with that third hop variety added by dry hopping late in the brewing process.
The beer also re-ferments in the bottle, leading to a production time of three months and one week from start to finish.
The basic Duvel recipe is never altered in any way. However, in making the Duvel Tripel Hop the brewer encounters new hop varieties. For example, Duvel Moortgat now use Citra for some of its other beers.



The Art is in The Nuance
“Do not view this Duvel Tripel Hop as an IPA,” Hedwig advises. “We are not in search of extreme bitterness. I’ll have you know that in the USA, our Vedett IPA is considered a pale-ale.” This brewer wants to make beers that tempt you into ordering seconds, while some extreme beers are aimed at a niche audience.
This applies equally to IPAs and to the up-and-coming sour ales. “Brewers will have to keep an even closer eye on the limits of sourness,” says Hedwig. “The art is in the nuance. Beers that are too sour are frankly undrinkable.”
This year Duvel Moortgat will be introducing a quartet of new Belgian beers. These beers will be launched first in a limited number of cafés and, if customers give the thumbs-up, they will be officially introduced to the market.
This was the path taken by Duvel Tripel Hop. It started off as an experiment and is now a regular annual addition to the range.
Is American beer culture increasingly filtering through to Belgium? “We are talking about two very different worlds,” Hedwig responds. “But I feel that they are becoming closer. The Americans become less extreme and the Belgians are experimenting more than they used to. In both countries I see a trend towards lighter beers with plenty of taste.”
Hedwig Neven knows exactly what he is talking about; he is in charge of 30 Belgian and 50 American beers, brewed in six Duvel Moortgat breweries, four in Belgium and two in the USA.

Thursday, April 2, 2015

Compounds in beer protect brain cells!

Alzheimer’s is a terrible disease that seems to strike innocent people out of nowhere. Any news of something that can help prevent it is good news, especially if the new preventative is something people want to consume anyway, like beer.
According to Foodbeast, a new study in the American Chemical Society's Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry reports that a compound commonly found in hops has an antioxidant property that can help protect brain cells. Oxidation causes damage to brain cells, which can contribute to the development of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

According to the new study, antioxidant compounds in beer can help protect brain cells from oxidation. This study has so far only been conducted on rats, but the implications give one reason to be optimistic. Further studies will need to be conducted before any kind of protective effect on human brains can be confirmed, but in the meantime come down to Café Anvers for a beer or two for some easy ways to sneak some more hops into your diet.